Avondale Meadows Middle School Parent-Teacher Blog

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    How to Talk and Listen to Your Teen

    Posted by Avondale Meadows Middle School on Feb 12, 2020 6:15:00 AM

    Talking to teens can be difficult. In their teen years, your child has one driving developmental task: pulling away from you to prepare for life on their own. That means testing boundaries and limitations to develop their understanding of consequences. At this age, kids are hard-wired to challenge authority. It's no wonder talking to them can be so tough.

    This phase is important for your child to develop into a healthy, high-functioning adult. You know that, but it doesn't make life with teens any less frustraring. 

    Fortunately, teenagers usually need more listening than talking. It's easy to think back on our own parents behavior and think lecturing and warning teens will keep them from making decisions that could have lasting negative consequences. Did it work for you? Chances are, it didn't. If you were anything like most teens, fear of another lectuure or worse made you hide your actions and look to your friends for answers to important questions. 

    Teens need guidance. Your job as the parent of a teen is to protect your child's trust and keep communication open between you. The Child Mind Institute, an organization dedicated to promoting the emotional and psychological wellbeing of children and teens, offers some helpful tips to make it through these years. We've listed these tips below. You can also click here to read the original article. 

     

    How to talk to teens1. Listen. If you are curious about what’s going on in your teen’s life, asking direct questions might not be as effective as simply sitting back and listening. Kids are more likely to be open with their parents if they don’t feel pressured to share information. Remember even an offhand comment about something that happened during the day is her way of reaching out, and you’re likely to hear more if you stay open and interested — but not prying.

    2. Validate their feelings. It is often our tendency to try to solve problems for our kids, or downplay their disappointments. But saying something like “She wasn’t right for you anyway” after a romantic disappointment can feel dismissive. Instead, show kids that you understand and empathize by reflecting the comment back: “Wow, that does sound difficult.”

    3. Show trust. Teens want to be taken seriously, especially by their parents. Look for ways to show that you trust your teen. Asking him for a favor shows that you rely on him. Volunteering a privilege shows that you think he can handle it. Letting your kid know you have faith in him will boost his confidence and make him more likely to rise to the occasion.

    4. Don’t be a dictator. You still get to set the rules, but be ready to explain them. While pushing the boundaries is natural for teenagers, hearing your thoughtful explanation about why parties on school nights aren’t allowed will make the rule seem more reasonable.

    5. Give praise. Parents tend to praise children more when they are younger, but adolescents need the self-esteem boost just as much. Teenagers might act like they’re too cool to care about what their parents think, but the truth is they still want your approval. Also looking for opportunities to be positive and encouraging is good for the relationship, especially when it is feeling strained.

    6. Control your emotions. It’s easy for your temper to flare when your teen is being rude, but don’t respond in kind. Remember that you’re the adult and he is less able to control his emotions or think logically when he’s upset. Count to ten or take some deep breaths before responding. If you’re both too upset to talk, hit pause until you’ve had a chance to calm down.

    7. Do things together. Talking isn’t the only way to communicate, and during these years it’s great if you can spend time doing things you both enjoy, whether it’s cooking or hiking or going to the movies, without talking about anything personal. It’s important for kids to know that they can be in proximity to you, and share positive experiences, without having to worry that you will pop intrusive questions or call them on the carpet for something.

    8. Share regular meals. Sitting down to eat a meal together as a family is another great way to stay close. Dinner conversations give every member of the family a chance to check in and talk casually about sports or television or politics. Kids who feel comfortable talking to parents about everyday things are likely to be more open when harder things come up, too. One rule: no phones allowed.

    9. Be observant. It’s normal for kids to go through some changes as they mature, but pay attention if you notice changes to her mood, behavior, energy level, or appetite. Likewise, take note if he stops wanting to do things that used to make him happy, or if you notice him isolating himself. If you see a change in your teen’s daily ability to function, ask her about it and be supportive (without being judgmental). She may need your help and it could be a sign she needs to talk to a mental health professional.

    Topics: Parenting

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